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Recovering from job loss

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NO JOB IS PERMANENT. At some point, you will be required to change jobs or even your career path. Whether you leave voluntarily, are laid off or fired, the change can be a difficult one, especially when it is unexpected. It’s not uncommon for employees who have been laid off or fired to feel angry and betrayed by their former employer and co-workers.{{more}}

For some people, losing a job is almost like losing a family, as bonds form over time when people work together. The transition can also be difficult when an individual’s identify revolves around his or her career; the toll can be emotionally and socially devastating.

To survive a job loss, it is important not to dwell on the negative feelings or moments of disorientation. Acknowledge the feelings and take a day or two to pull your thoughts together. Begin to evaluate your position and develop a strategy to move into the next phase of your professional life.

If you were fired, look at the areas of your personality or performance that caused the problem, and address them. Set new professional goals and lay the foundation to blaze a new trail.

If you plan to return to the job market, revisit your resume. Does it accurately reflect your current skills and abilities? Are there skill sets you need to develop through a short-term course? Have the resumé reviewed by a trusted business associate in the field you are applying for, or a career advisor. Try not to use a friend, as it is hard to be an objective friend at times.

Sharpen your interviewing skills by reviewing common interview questions and identifying the ways you can be an invaluable resource to your future employer.

Choose three power-interviewing suits and keep them clean, pressed and complete with accessories.

The next step should be networking. It’s common knowledge that people do business with people they know and like. It’s easier to get a job on a referral than it is to apply cold.

Let everyone know you are looking for a new position and familiarize them with your credentials and the type of position you would like to obtain. This is a good time to volunteer your services to an organization, as you never know whom you can meet.

Karen Hinds is “The Workplace Success Expert.” For a FREE SPECIAL REPORT on Avoiding Career Killers in the Workplace, send an email to info@workplacesuccess.com

Visit online at www.workplacesuccess.com

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