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Prostate enlargement and sexuality

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Over the last two weeks, I have looked at abnormal prostate conditions, namely prostate infections called prostatitis. These infections may be acute or chronic. I said an acute infection occurs suddenly and is very symptomatic with fever, lower back and perineal pain, burning on peeing and other urinary symptoms.{{more}} Chronic infections occur when the acute ones are not treated properly or are missed or misdiagnosed. The symptoms of an acute infection are vague and usually involved urinary symptoms and lower back pain, with the absence of fever. Now we look at the condition called Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) or a swollen noncancerous prostate. I said in the opening statement that infections in the prostate were “abnormal,” as are all infections. However, BPH is “normal,” as it is the normal enlargement of the prostate that occurs as men age.

BPH will occur in virtually all men as they age. It is rare that you will find a man at seventy without evidence of prostate swelling. This normal swelling first occurs at puberty and continues throughout life, but accelerates around age 35. Most men start having urinary symptoms around age 50. These symptoms are very mild initially and usually involve getting up to pee once or twice at night. They also notice when they get home in the evening, as they place the key in the door lock, the urge to pee is almost unavoidable. These symptoms get worse, but slowly, over the next 10 to 15 years so; most men ignore these symptoms as just the “normal process of ageing,” only to have an “event” sometime along the way. These “events” involve such things as an infection; blood in the urine or more commonly a stoppage of the water. These events are usually what remind men that they have a prostate. Before such “events” most men will notice that when they want to pee they have to wait to start (hesitancy), the pee stream itself is slow and there might be starting and stopping (intermittency), along with a lot of dribbling at the end. Others complain that when they are finished peeing there is a feeling of not emptying and they may have some pain in the lower abdomen, just in the “bladder area”. Still others have more irritating symptoms, like the sudden urge to pee at times (urgency), the constant going to pee (frequency) and burning when peeing (dysuria).

The above symptoms occur because the prostate gland surrounds the urine passage just as it leaves the bladder. As the prostate swells with age, it “presses” on the urine passage and obstructs the flow of urine. The above symptoms are just the response of the bladder to the slow, but progressive, increase in blockage. Not all men have problems peeing, even though virtually all men will have prostate swelling as they get older. Some men will experience one of the above big “events” without admitting to symptoms. This usually means that they have ignored the warning signs discussed above. This is not uncommon, as most men are too busy working and worrying about family, bills, house, land, vehicle and other things to take care of themselves and because prostate enlargement symptoms are usually insidious and not bothersome, they tend to ignore the symptoms. It is, however, important that men get regularly yearly checks from age 40, because just as life begins at 40, so do things that tend to go bad. They usually start around 40. These “things” include sugar, pressure, high cholesterol, heart attacks, erection and prostate problems and alcohol abuse.

For comments or question contact:
Dr Rohan Deshong
Tel: (784) 456-2785
email: [email protected]

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