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Mystery man comes forward to claim Lotto $1/2 million

Mystery man comes forward to claim Lotto $1/2 million

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The mystery is over. Colin Shoy is the half millionaire who the National Lotteries Authority (NLA) has been looking for close to six months. Shoy is the winner of the second largest NLA jackpot ever, $591.000.{{more}}

While NLA officials claim that they were being abused and accused of being part of a massive conspiracy over this jackpot, Shoy and his sister, Cristalyn, explained last Wednesday at a press conference that the delay was a big mix-up.

According to the Shoys, Colin bought the ticket for the Friday, June 27, 2008, draw, and after the draw was made that night, he was convinced that he had won.

However, the next morning, he tried to verify the winning numbers, and the numbers given to him by a lotto agent in Barrouallie didn’t match the numbers on his ticket.

Luckily, Colin did not throw away the ticket, but put it up, as he claims he does with other tickets.

Meanwhile, questions were asked, theories were developed, as to where the winner of the huge sum was, and why they hadn’t claimed their prize.

“I have been verbally abused. People called this office and using all kinds of expletives about this money, saying how I am this thief, how I have the money here, and that the money was won by my Chairman (Murray Bullock) and he is going to collect it,” said General Manager of the NLA, Mc Gregor Sealey.

“It is with deep relief today that I am about to hand over this cheque…I am really relieved that this ticket has surfaced,” Sealey, who has been at the helm of the NLA for the last 25 years, said.

Sealy also used the opportunity to urge players of NLA games to check with the head office when they are unsure about their winnings.

He said that the NLA has had complaints from some people who say that they were not paid what they were due by some lottery agents.

In one case, a woman who won $525 in a game was only given $75 by an agent.

Shoy, a farmer of Rose Bank, said that he was very sorry that the NLA officials had to be subject to such abuse.

“I am sorry for the hurt caused to the National Lottery,” Shoy said.

He, however, said that he hoped that in the future that people would look at the NLA in a different way “and continue to play.”

Shoy and his sister had high praise for the SEARCHLIGHT newspaper, which ran the story “Who has $1/2 million lotto ticket?”, on the front page of their December 12, 2008, edition and pointed out that the winner had until Christmas Eve day to claim the money, within the 180 days that is stipulated by law.

Christalyn said that when she read the story, she told her mother to show it to her brother when he got home last Saturday night.

It is when he compared the winning numbers in the story 7,15,30,33,36 to his ticket that he realized that as he had thought back in June, he was the winner.

As he congratulated Shoy on winning the big prize, Chairman of the NLA, Murray Bullock said that he has known Shoy very well for years, and wished him all the best.

Bullock challenged Shoy to spend wisely and expressed his willingness, at Shoy’s request, to give him free financial advice.

After the 10 per cent government tax was taken out, Shoy received $531,900, and told reporters that he and his family have not yet planned for their new found fortune. (KJ)

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